Manchester City Council

The Council & democracy Questions to The Executive

Questions to The Executive for 2016

Councillor Sheila Newman, Executive Member for Children’s Services, was asked a question by Presley Princewill who lives in Manchester:

I have appealed about my free school bus pass and they have asked me to send a picture. I want to know what the address is?

Councillor Sheila Newman replied:

The contact address is;

School Travel Pass Appeals 
The Corporate Complaints Team
PO Box 532
Town Hall
Manchester                                                                                                                                                                                          M60 2LA

16 December 2016.


Councillor Rosa Battle, Executive Member for the Environment, was asked a question by Norman Edwards, who lives in Manchester:
Please could you tell me why we can't have street lights on Ridings Street behind Colliery Street. It's pitch black when night time comes its very dangerous because cars and trucks go up and down this very narrow street. Not only that people fly tip because it's so dark that no one can see who has dumped the rubbish it gets set on fire quite a lot against people's property. For many years (20) we at Colliery Street are forever contacting the council about these problems but no one is listens or are not interested please could you look into this problem and give us an answer to why we can't have street light after all as the council keep pointing out that it IS a street and not a back entry. Many thanks.

Councillor Rosa Battle replied:
Thank you for your question.

Ridings Street, behind Colliery Street, is an unadopted highway, which means the City Council do not own or have any responsibility for the management of the road. The owners of the road (which are usually the fronting properties) may wish to consider arranging for private lighting, which would be a private arrangement between a contractor, the residents and an electric supplier. The city council can offer you advice in this respect and if you contact Simon Cook (s.cook1@manchester.gov.uk) he will be able to help you with this.

15 December 2016.


Councillor Nigel Murphy, Executive Member for Neighbourhoods, was asked a question by Cindy, who lives and works in Manchester:

There is an ongoing battle with Biffa. I have complained in the past about our green bins not being emptied. After your involvement it was ok for a while, but again today the bins were not emptied. Also 1 month ago our new black bins were delivered, but the old ones are still in the carpark of Greenheys (Upper Lloyd Street/Tommy Johnson/Great Western street). I complained to the council, but absolutely no reply.  

Councillor Nigel Murphy replied:  

Thank you for your question.  

I apologise for the service you have received. This is particularly disappointing as the City is keen to promote recycling and we need to make sure that the collection service supports those residents who take part. In your case, I am aware that there has been an ongoing issue with gaining access to your block and this has recently been resolved but the recent missed collection was due to the crew not taking the access fob with them when they had to change vehicles.  

Biffa have reassured me that they have now put in place appropriate measures to make sure this is not repeated. I have also asked that they return to collect the old black bins.  

6 December 2016.


Councillor John Flanagan, Executive Member for Finance & Human Resources, was asked a question by Ben Cooper who lives in Manchester: 

Completing one of your council surveys today seemed to indicate that the council spend £70,000 a year on an illuminated Santa above the town hall in the run up to Christmas. Can you confirm that this is correct and if so how you can justify this cost given the cuts to council services in Manchester, high levels of homelessness, crime, litter social deprivation and other pressing issues that presumably require and could benefit from additional council investment to tackle. I would also suggest that widespread perception of local government chronically wasting public money is perpetuated by such expenditure and wonder if you think this is a fair comment.

Councillor John Flanagan replied:  

Thank you for responding to the budget options consultation. We think it's really important to hear from residents and businesses, making sure that all views are thoroughly considered before we set out the proposed budget for the next three years.  

The money spent on Santa is for its construction, installation and subsequent removal as well as the engineer designed platform. This is to ensure it complies with structural engineering regulations as well as health and safety and risk management requirements for its high profile and very busy location. 

The Christmas decorations installed across the city bring significant benefits to the city as well as providing enjoyment to a large number of residents and visitors over the years. Santa is a key part of the city centre festivities including the lights, events and Christmas markets. These festivities raise the profile of Manchester on a national and international scale, last Christmas over 9 million people visited the Christmas markets and past events have boosted the economy by up to £90m supporting 25,000 seasonal jobs. With our biggest opening weekend for the markets to date, we're on target to smash this figure already.  

With between £40 million to £75 million to save over the next three years, we need to consider all options. The option to not install Santa in future years is one amongst many that officers have put forward for Councillors to consider. There are unfortunately some difficult decisions to be made and that's why we're grateful that you took the time to let us know what you think.  

22 November 2016.


Councillor Nigel Murphy, Executive Member for Neighbourhoods, was asked a question by John Brooks, who lives in Manchester .

Why is it that despite repeated requests via your website, via telephone via email and via personal visit to the Town Hall customer services department my old black bin still remains uncollected?

Councillor Nigel Murphy replied:

Thank you for your question.

Throughout the summer we have exchanged the black bins at over 150,000 homes in Manchester . The vast majority of black bins were removed on the day of the exchange, but a small number were not taken. We have also had unprecedented demand for recycling bins as a result of this exchange programme. This has stretched our resources and in a few cases, we have not been able to act as fast as we would usually.

We are now getting back to normal, and we will be removing any old bins that have been reported to us as soon as we can. I have asked an officer to ensure this particular bin is removed as soon as possible.

17 November 2016.


Councillor Nigel Murphy, Executive Member for Neighbourhoods, was asked a question by Dan Packwood, who lives in Manchester.

I'm sure you've had many and numerous incredibly interesting bin related questions to answer recently, so I apologise for adding one more. I support initiatives to increase recycling rates, however I'm sure I'm not alone in the city in that we work away from home not infrequently during the week. With a larger bin it didn't matter if we missed a collection as there was plenty of space; now we have a small bin which somehow has to fit a month's worth of waste when we're not home to take out the bins. What would you suggest as a reasonable solution? I recognise that we're operating in times of constrained funding - in an ideal world I'd be happy with an even smaller bin if it was collected weekly. Best, Dan

Councillor Nigel Murphy replied:

Thank you for your question.

The recent changes to the bin collection service will save more than £2.4 million every year to the City Council because non-recyclable waste costs much more to deal with than recycling. The early signs are that we will exceed this saving target as residents have overwhelmingly embraced the changes and are recycling more than ever. We have seen a massive increase in the number of households that have asked for new recycling bins in order that they can manage their waste effectively. This has also been reflected in the reduced tonnages collected in the grey bins and the massive reductions in recycling weight.

Introducing weekly collections would be a backwards step for the City, which would see an decrease in recycling and therefore a massive hike in the cost of disposal. This is not something the City can afford nor something that residents would than us for.

We introduced a 140 litre bin collection service for residual waste because the majority of residents would be able to cope with the new bin as there is plenty of room for their waste providing they recycle. As much as three quarters of all waste can be recycled as long as residents use the blue, brown and green bin facilities. I recognise that some people won't be able to cope despite recycling everything and that is why we provide additional capacity for households who are 6 or more persons, where somebody has a medical condition that means they have more waste, there are 2 young children still in nappies or any other exceptional circumstances.

I am sure you will appreciate that it is not reasonable or practical to design a service for residents who are not in Manchester on collection days. I know that whenever my friends, family or neighbours are away on collection day I am happy to present and return their bins. I am sure that if you asked a neighbour they would be happy to help you.

17 November 2016.


Councillor Nigel Murphy, Executive Member for Neighbourhoods, was asked a question by Mohammed Sheeraz, who lives in Manchester .

My new grey bin has not been delivered.  I told the staff I had filled out an online form but no action was taken then I call the city council environmental department on two different occasions on Friday 14 October I was told some one will deliver the bin on Friday but it has not been derived . Our old grey bin was collected on Wednesday 5th October since then I contacted council many time but still bin has not been delivered. I have no bin to put waste in. On Wednesday 19 October is our bin collection day if my bin is not delivered before that day will put black bags outside.

Councillor Nigel Murphy replied:

I understand you now have your new bin. I apologise for the inconvenience caused.

The bin exchange programme has been a major logistical exercise with almost 160,000 households having their bins exchanged over a three month period. We have aimed to deliver the programme as smoothly as possible with minimum disruption to residents.  Clearly this has not been the case for you and I apologise.

11 November 2016.


Councillor Rosa Battle, Executive Member for the Environment, was asked a question by John Watson, who lives in Manchester:

Relevant to the increasing incidence of flash flooding caused by extreme storms:
Q1: Is the paving over of front gardens in Manchester forbidden?
Q2: If not, what rules apply?

Councillor Rosa Battle replied:

Thank you for your questions.

Q1: Is the paving over of front gardens in Manchester forbidden?

Manchester City Council do not generally prevent residents paving over their front garden, however there may be some exceptions to this, please see the answer to question 2.

Q2: If not, what rules apply?

In some circumstances there may be rules that will need to be followed before a front garden can be paved over. The general principles are if the material to be used does not naturally let water drain through it and the area to be covered is greater than 5 square metres then planning permission would be required.

There is an exception to this and that is if the area to be paved directs water to a lawn or border area that then allows the water to naturally drain away.

Before making any alterations to your property it would be advisable to contact the Planning Department to ensure that what you want to do complies with Planning Regulations. They can be contacted using the following link:  https://secure.manchester.gov.uk/forms/form/989/en/contact_us_about_a_planning_issue

11 November 2016.


Councillor Luthfur Rahman, Executive Member for Outdoor Leisure, was asked a question by Jane Mackinnon who lives in Manchester and works in Greater Manchester.

In light of attacks on livestock and birds in parks in Manchester including Wythenshawe Park .  Are there any plans to supply more security for the safety of the animals located in the parks?

Councillor Luthfur Rahman replied:

Thank you for your question.

In response, I can confirm that a review of security at the Stables/Farm Centre in Wythenshawe Park and the Horticultural Centre have been undertaken. 

The review has led to improvements to the CCTV and intruder alarms, as well as targeted visits from Park Security, particularly during the dark winter evenings.

Whilst the review has brought about improvements there will be a closer look at safety and security in the Park as part of the plan to improve visitor facilities following the fire at Wythenshawe Hall.

I hope you find this useful and would suggest that if you wish to talk about this matter in more detail that you contact John Mouncey, Manager for Wythenshawe Park on 0161 998 2117 or j.mouncey@manchester.gov.uk

10 November 2016.


Councillor Nigel Murphy, Executive Member for Neighbourhoods, was asked a question by Donald Judge, who lives in Manchester .

A bus priority package is currently being completed along Wilmslow /Oxford Road, which I welcome and which I hope will improve the environment and make bus journeys more efficient. I often get off the bus opposite the former BBC building on Oxford Road . From there to Oxford Road Station is a black spot for street clutter. Some is no doubt necessary signage for motorists which should disappear once the work is finished. But a lot of it is advertising by businesses in the form of boards on the pavement that is at best inconvenient on an often busy pedestrian route, and downright dangerous for the blind or partially sighted. Greggs and Caffe Nero are the worst offenders with theirs often plonked in the middle of the footway. Along with the litter and begging, it creates a shocking impression of Manchester for visitors walking between Ox Rd Stn and the University... Is it possible to get the offending A-boards removed and make Oxford Road a Pedestrian Priority Package?

Councillor Nigel Murphy replied:

Thank you for bringing this issue to our attention.  The Neighbourhood Officer will visit the businesses in this stretch of Oxford Road to assess the situation. 

In general the Council does not encourage the use of A boards in this type of location.  We will engage the businesses and with the aim of reaching an agreement with them; if this is not possible the Council can take enforcement action to remove an obstruction on the highway. 

The officer will make contact with Mr Judge to keep him updated on progress.

3 November 2016.


Councillor Nigel Murphy, Executive Member for Neighbourhoods, was asked a question by Sarah Rooke, who lives and works in Manchester:

Came across a scheme on Twitter that is being used in Lincolnshire linked to the #nomore campaign whereby if a person feels unsafe etc they can go to the bar and 'Ask for Angela' and bar staff will know and support person to get out of the situation. Would send copy of the poster but I'm using my phone and don't think I can add pictures on this ask a question page. Could we use the same or similar in Manchester ?

Councillor Nigel Murphy replied:

Thank you for bringing this to the attention of the City Council. This is timely given the time of the year as there appears to be real merit in looking at how such an initiative, or something of this nature, could assist alongside others that exist to help with issues associated with the night time economy. I have asked for this to be raised through the multi agency partnership we have adopted in the City as a soon as possible and we will speak to Lincolnshire about the initiative.

2 November 2015.


Councillor Nigel Murphy, Executive Member for Neighbourhoods, was asked a question by Mr Brian Cowell, who lives in Manchester :

Checking green bin collections for postcode M9 6EX on your website they are not shown, even though they are on others eg M9 7BA, M9 7DL, also we have not had a new card for collection dates the one we have runs out in a couple of weeks.

Councillor Nigel Murphy replied:

I apologise that the system did not show the green bin schedule for M9 6EX, Mr Cowell was correct. This has now been rectified so all collection dates including the green bins are working on the MCC website for that postcode.  All properties in the area have now received an update calendar. 

2 November 2015.


Councillor Nigel Murphy, Executive Member for Neighbourhoods, was asked a question by Michael Schofield, who lives in Manchester:

The City Council apparently have no trouble with my address when it comes to collecting Council Tax, or the removal of my old black waste bin. However, when it comes to providing a replacement bin it's another story. I watched with interest as the new smaller bins were wheeled out on Lindsay Avenue but, regrettably, my house somehow evaded detection. I'm wondering whether it may therefore be easier in the future to send my unrecyclable waste direct to the Town Hall? Have you got Mr Leese's room number? I've submitted the requisite form (three-times) to say my new bin has not been delivered, but this continues to be ignored. Seemingly, long-gone are the days when you could reasonably expect the courtesy of a reply so as to inform you of what is happening. It's a wonderful system the City Council now have, designed to increase frustration levels whilst simultaneously removing any meaningful avenues of communication. Oh for the inefficient, non-technological days of customer service when you could pick up a phone and speak to someone. From what I've heard other properties also appear to have been 'randomly overlooked' so this is not an isolated incident. Perhaps the person tasked with the responsibility for overseeing the implementation of this policy will wish to comment.

Councillor Nigel Murphy replied:

Thank you for your email.

The bin exchange programme has been a major logistical exercise with almost 160,000 households having their bins exchanged over a three month period. We have aimed to deliver the programme as smoothly as possible with minimum disruption to residents. Clearly this has not been the case for you and I apologise. It appears that the part of the website you used to request your new grey bin was not working and the job was not passed to our contractor. This has now been resolved and the City Council officers have contacted all people affected.

I understand you now have your new bin. I apologise for the inconvenience caused.

28 October 2016.


Councillor Bernard Priest, Deputy Leader of the Council, was asked a question by Andrew Wigley:

The New Brunswick Street Park the University are working on, who will own the land? Has the Manchester University bought the land or been given it? As they want to close the right of way. If it is City Council land, should they be allowed? MMU in Hulme have left a right of way on their land, why should MU not do the same?

Councillor Bernard Priest replied:

The City Council has granted planning consent (22nd July 2016) for the University of Manchester to develop a public park on their land adjacent to Brunswick Street and including part of Brunswick Street itself. Their plans include the creation of a walking/cycling route between Upper Brook Street and Oxford Road. In order to complete the public park, the University are applying to close this part of Brunswick Street. This is currently subject to consultation.

The planning application includes confirmation that the proposals do not "require any diversions/extinguishments and/or creation of rights of way" (Section 6 - Pedestrian and Vehicle Access, Roads and Rights of Way). This means that the obligation to maintain current rights of way will apply to this land whoever is the owner.

The City Council will usually agree a lease as part of a road closure to ensure that is properly maintained as a public right of way.

27 October 2016


Councillor Rosa Battle, Executive Member for the Environment, was asked a question by Tony Harrison, who lives and works in Manchester:

The parking bollards between the Town Hall and the Town Hall Annex have been out of order for at least the last 3 months. During that time the Council has been employing 2 (and sometimes as many as 3) full time guards between the hours of 7.00-19.00 for 7 days a week. All that these guards do is move 2 traffic cones when a vehicle needs to access the 10 parking spaces - including the Mayoral Volvo. Surely this is an ENORMOUS waste of public money and it should have been possible to have the automatic bollards repaired within a reasonable timescale. As far as I can see the guards spend most of their time smoking and talking to any female passers-by. No doubt you will argue that there are security implications but surely there is a more cost effective solution - you could , for example, leave the bollards up and pay for the dozen or so people who actually park there to use an NCP. I wonder if the Manchester Evening News would be interested to learn of this ludicrous wastage.

Councillor Rosa Battle replied:

Thank you for your question.

I can confirm that the automated bollards at this particular location are not broken or awaiting repair and that they are in working order.  The access is currently patrolled due to the interface with the Metrolink Second City Crossing track construction works and road closure on Princess Street.

Lloyd Street normally operates on a simple one-way system with vehicles accessing via the automated bollards off Mount Street and with vehicles then exiting onto Princess Street.  It has been necessary to close the exit onto Princess Street to allow the new track construction, highway and paving works to be completed.  In order to continue to allow vehicles to access Lloyd Street on Council business to minimize the impact on Manchester City Council, this interface was discussed in detail with the Town Hall Facilities Management Team with the Metrolink project providing operatives at the automated bollards to assist vehicles to access the area, turn safely and exit again via Mount Street against the flow of normal traffic, as the automated bollards only normally work on entry, we understand that they have to be physically activated to allow a vehicle to exit as the automated bollard system is not set up that way.

A Manchester City Council briefing note was issued in advance of the works commencing to advise users of the Town Hall of the measures that were to be employed.

The actual number of operatives to be provided was initially determined by Manchester City Council in line with the usage of Lloyd Street, but this is under review to see if practically they can now be reduced as regular visitors and deliveries have had time over the past 2 months to get used to the closure.

With regard to the comment raised on the operatives smoking and talking to passers-by, this will be raised with the relevant Supervisor for observation.

Hopefully this explains the situation, which will likely continue for a few more weeks until all paving works are complete.

18 October 2016.


Councillor Sir Richard Leese, Leader of the Council, was asked a question by Kalvin Chapman, who lives and works in Manchester:

I am a citizen of Manchester. I pay council tax. Manchester Council is not representative of the electorate, because it is entirely made up of Labour Councillors, despite that Labour did not attain 95% of the vote it does make up 95% of the council. Given the democratic deficit in representation at the council, why am I not allowed to attend a public meeting and ask the Council questions? Why are the Councillors not publicly answerable to the electorate? Why am I not allowed to have my voice heard?

Councillor Sir Richard Leese replied:

Thank you for your question.

Labour candidates won with over 50% of the vote in 31 out of 32 Manchester seats, so Labour's current majority reflects the view of our electorate. Councillors though are expected to represent all of their electorate and voters can ask them questions in person at their advice bureaux, by email , letter or text. Councillors regularly attend a range of public forums in their wards.

Members of the public can ask to speak to any Council Committee where there is an item on the agenda of relevance to them. Permission to speak is at the discretion of the Chair. For example, the Chair of Castlefield Forum spoke at the last Executive Committee about Neighbourhood Planning.

On top of direct questions to Executive Members, any elector can ask a question more formally where the questions and responses are posted on line.

18 October 2017.


Councillor Nigel Murphy, Executive Member for Neighbourhoods, was asked a question by Warrick, who lives in Manchester.

Which genius designed the new grey rubbish bins with a dip in the top lid? I have been soaked through 3 times so far due to this rookie design error. The dip catches all the rain water and dew, why did they not keep the same design as the other recycling bins? Can I have a new one which doesn't hold water to be dispersed on my person please? Thanks

Councillor Nigel Murphy replied:

The new grey bins are manufactured by MGB limited. MGB were awarded the contract against the standard specification although each manufacturer provides a slightly different bin based upon their specific designs. MGB provided the City Council with by far the best value for money and were able to deliver the bins in a timely manner so that we could introduce the service change quickly and start to achieve the target saving of £2.4 million per year.

We are aware that the lids are slightly concave in nature and a small amount of water pools after rain. I have not found this to be a major issue and on wet days I just open the lid carefully and the water easily runs off. I am afraid we are not able to replace your bin with a different model.

7 October 2016.


Councillor Rosa Battle, Executive Member for the Environment, was asked a question by Mark Eccles, who lives in Manchester:

Resident bays & Pay & Display, what I want to know is why there's such a shortage of them in Manchester? Why is Manchester City Council throwing away £millions every year in lost revenue, I'm disabled now, I used to work at Chelsea Creek Car Pound as a Removal Driver & Clamper in Kensington & Chelsea.

Councillor Rosa Battle replied:

Thank you for your question.

The Council needs to balance the flow of traffic through the city, offering short and long stay parking options, as well as providing resident parking for our growing population living in the city centre.  Manchester has over 1,900 on street parking bays, which are operational 7 days a week from 8am until 8pm.  These bays are used by visitors making shorter stops. For long stay parking we work with our partner NCP to offer over 15,000 off street car parking spaces.

26 September 2016.


Councillor Nigel Murphy, Executive Member for Neighbourhoods, was asked a question by Michael Schofield who lives in Manchester:

What should I do after the big bins are changed when the smaller bin gets filled before collection date.

Councillor Nigel Murphy replied:

Thank you for your question.

The City Council has made the decision to change the rubbish bin size from 240 litres to 140 litre to protect services. Non-recyclable waste costs much more to deal with. Reducing this waste and increasing recycling will help to save at least £2.4million a year. This could be spent on services residents tell us they want, such as maintenance of roads and parks, improved street cleaning and better leisure centres.

Before making this decision, the City reviewed the impact that reducing the bin sizes has had on other authorities. Residents quickly got used to the new regime and recycling rates increased. I accept that there are a great many people who already recycle but we know from elsewhere that there are many residents who do not recycle as much as they could and that once their residual waste capacity is reduced they use their recycling facilities more regularly. The City does work with private landlords to promote recycling and many have pledged to help their tenants do more but the City Council recognises that more can be done.

We could have made savings by emptying the old larger bins less often. Instead, by introducing smaller bins, we can continue to collect rubbish every two weeks and collection days won’t change.

Three-quarters of all waste can be recycled, so there should be enough room for all non-recyclable waste in the new smaller grey bin. Residents can get extra or bigger recycling bins free at manchester.gov.uk/recycling.

However, we recognise that some households will require additional capacity even if they are recycling.  The following households are eligible for more capacity providing they are recycling all that they can:

Households of six or more people

Households with two small small children in nappies will receive a year’s supply of sacks to increase the amount of residual waste collected

Households where one or more resident has a medical condition that produces more waste

Households that have exceptional circumstances not set out above but create additional non-recyclable waste.

This can be applied for via the following link www.manchester.gov.uk/recycling.

23 September 2016.


Councillor Nigel Murphy, Executive Member for Neighbourhoods, was asked a question by Ansar Kazi, who lives and works in Manchester :

I would like to know if it was possible for my black bin to not be replaced by smaller bin for the fact that I have a family of 5 people and we really do not want to have a smaller bin as we want to keep the bin we already have. Thanks

Councillor Nigel Murphy replied:

Thank you for your question.

Three-quarters of all waste can be recycled, so there should be enough room for all non-recyclable waste in the new smaller grey bin. You can get extra or bigger recycling bins free at manchester.gov.uk/recycling.

However, we recognise that some households will require additional capacity even if they are recycling.  The following households are eligible for more capacity providing they are recycling all that they can:

Households of six or more people

Households with two small small children in nappies will receive a year’s supply of sacks to increase the amount of residual waste collected

Households where one or more resident has a medical condition that produces more waste

Households that have exceptional circumstances not set out above but create additional non-recyclable waste.

This can be applied for via the following link www.manchester.gov.uk/recycling.

23 September 2016.


Councillor Paul Andrews, Executive Member for Adult Health and Wellbeing, was asked a question by June Bradbury, who lives in Manchester:

I know we have to accept and help Asylum Seekers but do we have to put up the accommodation they live in scruffy, old sheets at the windows for years never being washed, gardens not being tended to. This road has always look decent we are not millionaires but these homes are a disgrace and the Tenants Temporary or not do not make any effort to clean them. Why do WE have to live with this ??

Councillor Paul Andrews, replied:

Properties used to accommodate asylum seekers have to meet standards set out in the statement of requirements, which forms part of the contract between the Home Office and its provider, Serco.  The Home Office is responsible for ensuring that these standards are achieved.  All properties are provided with curtains. Grass and hedges are trimmed to a basic standard.  All properties are inspected monthly by Serco Housing Officers. 

Asylum seekers are subject to the same requirements as other occupiers (eg owner occupiers private or social tenants).

21st September 2016. 


Councillor Rosa Battle, Executive Member for the Environment, was asked a question by John McNee, who works in Manchester:

The recent protest /march by a number of people under the title black lives matters took place on public roads. Did the organizations apply for permission and was a fee charged and paid. If not why not also what was the fee? I believe the organization that were responsible for the recent whit walks and Italian community walk had to pay a fee is this true?

Councillor Rosa Battle replied:

Thank you for your questions.

The Council makes a charge for planned processions and parades where road closures or other support from our Highways team is necessary. This support helps to ensure that those taking part in parades and processions are safe and that other road users are informed of any changes to their route as a result. These charges did apply to both the recent Whit Walks, the Italian Community Walk and a range of other parades, processions and events.

The organisers behind the recent Black Lives Matter protest march did not inform the Council about the march and so did not require support from our Highways team in advance. As a result there was no charge associated with this march.

I hope this answers your questions.

21 September 2016.


Councillor Rosa Battle, Executive Member for the Environment was asked a question from Matt Sumners, who lives and works in Manchester:

I use Hyde road EVERY day; and recently you've been busy resurfacing a part of the road - (which all looks nice a new) - but stopped well short of what is the probably THE worst part of the A57 alongside The Car wash and Belle Vue Station (Towards Manchester) the road surface is nigh on impossible to cycle over and terrible to drive over it.... I see drivers moving out their way to avoid driving over the mess on that inside lane. Whilst on the subject of Hyde Road what seems to be happening with the Hyde Road widening scheme up near to the Old railway Bridge & Debdale Park . The area was cleared and a nice shiney new sign was erected and yet nothing is being done.... this is a huge bottleneck which needs sorting out.... plus the cycle lane that was in place was removed some time ago; which seems odd given that Manchester is championing the bike in the city centre; how about giving us a lane to cycle into / out of town in the first place? Yes i know this is a long winded couple of questions; but something i'd dearly an answer to. thank you.

Councillor Rosa Battle replied:

Thank you for your question.  

We will be resurfacing the full length of Hyde Road from Ardwick Green to the Manchester City Boundary. This is being completed in sections as the road is also undergoing a number of other improvements which resurfacing will be scheduled to coincide with.  

Work will begin on the next stage of resurfacing (near to Belle Vue Station) in Spring next year and will be completed by Summer. We have scheduled this for this time so that is causes the least amount of traffic disruption during the football season.

The widening scheme is also going ahead and will include extra space for both cyclists and pedestrians. This is a major engineering project involving the replacement of the existing bridge and, as a result, the planning stages have taken some time.  We're working hard to get this started as soon as possible and have allocated the funds to carry.

21st September 2016.


Councillor Nigel Murphy, Executive Member for Neighbourhoods, was asked a question by Sally Lunt who lives and works in Manchester :

We are due to have our black bins collected Monday 12th September to a smaller grey bin . I am all for recycling but please can you advise as we have a baby in the family & we use disposable nappies is there anyway we can keep the black bin.

Councillor Nigel Murphy replied:

Non-recyclable waste costs much more to deal with. Putting less in your rubbish bin and more in your recycling helps save at least £2.4million a year. This could be spent on services residents tell us they want, such as maintenance of roads and parks, street cleaning and leisure centres.

We could have made savings by emptying the old larger bins less often. Instead, by introducing smaller bins, we can continue to collect your rubbish every two weeks. Collection days won’t change.

Three-quarters of all waste can be recycled, so there should be enough room for all non-recyclable waste in the new smaller grey bin even for households with a small child in nappies. You can get extra or bigger recycling bins free at manchester.gov.uk/recycling.

15 September 2016.


Councillor Nigel Murphy, Executive Member for Neighbourhoods, was asked a question by Thomas Connaughton, who lives and works in Manchester:

I've not long moved into the address stated. I paid £20 for my wheelie bin. Now council say they're changing it for smaller one. Personally I don't want a smaller one and if this can't be avoided will my £20 be refunded?

Councillor Nigel Murphy replied:

Thank you for your enquiry.  

Non-recyclable waste costs much more to deal with. Putting less in your rubbish bin and more in your recycling helps save at least £2.4million a year. This could be spent on services residents tell us they want, such as maintenance of roads and parks, street cleaning and leisure centres.  

We could have made savings by emptying the old larger bins less often. Instead, by introducing smaller bins, we can continue to collect your rubbish every two weeks. Collection days will not change. 

Three-quarters of all waste can be recycled, so there should be enough room for all non-recyclable waste in the new smaller grey bin. You can get extra or bigger recycling bins free at manchester.gov.uk/recycling.  

You were charged an administration fee for the delivery of your current black bin as the costs to the city of organising delivery are significant. This payment was not to buy the bin.  

Thank you for contacting me, and I trust this answers your question.

15 September 2016.


Councillor Nigel Murphy, Executive Member for Neighbourhoods, was asked a question by Cindy Ba who lives and works in Manchester:

Over the last 3.5-4 months I have had to complain about the green bins not being emptied. In this period of time the collection was missed 13 times. Biffa employees fail to bring the fob to open our gated community in Moss Side. I want this solved once and for all. The bins stink, especially in summer. I'm sorely tempted to stop recycling food waste. The council wants to encourage recycling, yet this problem is not getting sorted. I am totally fed up

Councillor Nigel Murphy replied:

Thank you for recycling organic and food produce. We recognise residents make a major contribution to the environment by doing so as well as helping to protect local services by avoiding expensive waste. I am disappointed to hear about your recent experience and apologise for the service you have received. I am advised that our contractor Biffa have had difficulties accessing the security gates in order to empty your organic bins over recent weeks. This has now been resolved and so collections should take place on a regular basis. I have asked that officers monitor your collections for the next few weeks to ensure the service is as it should be.

Thank you again for recycling.

8 September 2016



Councillor Rosa Battle, Executive Member for Environment, was asked a question by Iain Bell, who lives in Manchester:

I live in a cul de sac off Cape Street and our bins are regularly not collected on our specified day. This is purely down to parked cars on Cape Street which prevents the bin lorry entering Cape Street or prevents it from turning around at the top and exiting Cape Street. I am extremely concerned that in the event of an emergency, the emergency services vehicles would be faced with the same issues. Can you advise why you cannot paint double yellow lines on both sides of Cape Street?

Councillor Rosa Battle replied:

Thank you for your question.

Following your enquiry about parked cars on Cape Street which prevents the bin lorry and potentially the emergency services accessing properties along this road and side roads; the Neighbourhood Manager & Neighbourhood Officer have visited the street and concur large vehicles will be prevented from accessing properties if vehicles park along Cape Street.

A traffic regulation order for double yellow lines is likely to take 10 months to implement, will require the support of the vast majority of residents and funding would have to be identified against competing priorities with limited resources. Cape Street is a short street, servicing a small number of properties with their own parking facilities. The preferred solution is to persuade residents to park sensitively avoiding parking on Cape Street.

I understand that you (Iain) have contacted residents which is making an initial impact. The Council will follow up with a similar letter to the properties along Cape St and the flats on the corner of Mauldeth Rd West. If the problem persists Greater Manchester Police will be contacted about the possibility of prosecution as they have responsibility for enforcement on vehicles causing an obstruction. Maura O'Brien, the Neighbourhood Manager for Old Moat will continue to liaise with yourself on addressing the problem.

26 August 2016


Councillor Nigel Murphy, Executive Member for Neighbourhoods, was asked a question by Harry Norcliffe, who lives and works in Manchester:

Are the address labels on the new SMALLER grey wheelie bins to be addressed with my home address? if so I believe this to be against the data protection act and would like this stopped.

Councillor Nigel Murphy replied:

Thank you for your query regarding the new Residual Waste Bin Rollout.

Address stickers have been placed on the bins to help with the delivery process of the new bins to each household in the city.  As you may appreciate this is a huge undertaking and we have taken this measure to help the rollout go as smoothly as is possible.  The stickers are not a permanent feature on the bins and can be removed by yourself once it has been delivered.

The use of the address stickers in this way doesn't constitute use of 'personal data' as the address alone cannot be used to identify you as a resident.  This therefore doesn't fall under the remit of the Data Protection Act.

I hope this response helps to reassure you.

17 August 2016.


Councillor Nigel Murphy, Executive Member for Neighbourhoods, was asked a question by Bernard Leach, who lives in Manchester:

I support the City Council decision to reduce the size of the grey general waste bin. However, this would be made much easier, if like many other councils, you were able to include plastic food/fruit trays, yogurt pots and other plastics in the brown recycling bin and hence reduce the amount of general waste. Have you got any intention of including these plastics in the recycling scheme and if so, when?

Councillor Nigel Murphy replied:

Manchester accepts all plastic bottles, from juice to shampoo to bleach. Upto 75% of household waste can be recycled in Manchester,  the range of plastics that can be recycled is partly driven by the manufacturers that make new products and the grade and type of plastic that is required to make these products. For example, a yoghurt pot is made from a different type of plastic than bottles, both products As a yoghurt pot and a bottle melt at different temperatures, it means they cannot be recycled together. This is the reason why this type of plastic (yoghurt pots and food trays) should be placed in your new grey bin and plastic bottles should be placed in your brown bin to be recycled.

As mentioned above the range of plastics that can be recycled is driven by the manufacturers that use the recycled plastic to make new products. Currently these manufacturers need high grade bottle-shaped plastics to make their new products therefore there is much less demand for lower grade plastics to be recycled.

We will of course keep under review the types of plastics that can be recycled and continue to engage with the Waste Resource Action Programme (WRAP) and the government on this issue.

More information about this can be found at manchester.gov.uk/recycling

15 July 2016.


Councillor Nigel Murphy, Executive Member for Neighbourhoods, was asked a question by Georgina Birch.

You are going to be replacing all black bins in Manchester, yet we have only just recently paid to have a larger black bin for our property. How are large families going to manage with a small bin for things like nappies, wipes, and other wastage for the black bin? The collection is every 2 weeks, so if we had a smaller bin and that's full and we have nappies to dispose of, how are we going to do that? Are we going to be refunded for the large bin we have paid for? Or can we keep it because this is a ridiculous idea and everyone will be fly tipping in Manchester.

Councillor Nigel Murphy replied:

Up to 75% of waste can be recycled, from plastic bottles, paper and card to all left over food. We believe that the new bin is suitable for the vast majority of people in Manchester.

You are right that some large families need a bit more space and if you'd like to apply for more space, please visit manchester.gov.uk/recycling so that an officer can get in touch.

If you need more space in your recycling bins, or extra recycling bins, you can order them for free too.

If you find that you have extra waste occasionally, you can visit a Household Waste & Recycling Centre to dispose of it free of charge. They are in Newton Heath, Levenshulme and Sharston.

6 July 2016.


Councillor Kate Chappell, Executive Member for Environment was asked a question by Rich, who lives and works in Manchester:

The relatively recent permit scheme around certain areas of Manchester such as around the Christie hospital have made my life a nightmare for parking. I live just outside of the scheme area by a few metres but my street has always had very limited parking so I have usually parked on the streets 30 seconds from my house (which now requires a permit 8 am - 6 pm). My street has since become even more limited without consulting us and I now cannot park anywhere near my own house during the day. My street is not listed as one of the streets that can get a resident parking permit, is there anything else I can do?

Councillor Kate Chappell replied:

Thank you for your question.

The planning application for the Manchester Cancer Research Centre was approved with a number of conditions attached to it. The conditions included the implementation of a Green Travel Plan and the introduction of a residents parking scheme around The Christie Hospital to reduce the demand for parking in those residential streets. Some 1400 properties fall within the study area, these households were consulted by letter drop. In addition, details were published on the Council's website, advertised via social media and The Christie Neighbourhood Forum website. Consultation events open to the public were held at St Paul's Church Hall, and at a resident arranged meeting attended by Council officers. Regular updates were provided by Council officers at the Christie Neighbourhood Forum meetings. On street notices were displayed giving details to all if people wanted to object to the scheme, advertisements were also published in the Manchester Evening News.

Whilst side streets off Wilmslow Road south of Marriot Street, are now subject to long stay parking restrictions in operation during the working day, those north of Marriot Street remain unaffected by this scheme. Many of those streets are unrestricted and any vehicle may be parked there. The parking scheme that was introduced, applies only during the working day, allowing those without permits to park unrestricted during the evening and weekends on those streets within the scheme. Unfortunately only those properties that fall within the scheme are eligible to apply for permits.

I do hope that this answers your question.

5 July 2016.


Councillor Nigel Murphy, Executive Member for Neighbourhoods, was asked a question by a Manchester Resident:

Sorry, but I have to make this question: Why the streets of Manchester are so dirty!? I see some little machines cleaning some streets but it's not enough! A lot of plastic bottles, canes, food bag, cigarettes and so on in the streets even near of schools and public spots! It's need clean and wash the streets and the water canal is very dirty as well! Why you don't put responsibility for the owners of the bars, coffee spot to clean they own floor or walk!? Join a good clean team to get start clean this beautiful City of Manchester ! Regards.

Councillor Nigel Murphy replied: 

The City Council has taken a number of steps to address the issue of the litter and street cleanliness through its litter strategy and the appointment of street cleansing contractor Biffa. But we recognise there is still more to do. We are working closely with businesses to identify hotspots, provide small bins for cigarette ends and improve their commercial waste arrangements.  We also continue to deploy a task force in parts of the city which are most affected -  over the last year officers issued over 3000 fixed penalty notices for litter, cigarette butts and flyposting.  

We have a good relationship with our waste and street cleansing contractor and continue to work together to provide the most cost effective and efficient service possible. Using a flexible and responsive approach so that priority areas and hotspots are targeted as required.  If you see any area in the city that you feel are in need of more street cleansing you can report this online.  

You can report any hotspots online at:  

http://www.manchester.gov.uk/info/100006/environmental_problems/6163/remove_litter_dumped_rubbish_eyesores_or_spillages

I agree that there are still many challenges to address, and would like to reassure you that this continues to be a high priority for the City Council. 

29 June 2016.


Councillor Sheila Newman, Executive Member for Children’s Services was asked a question by David Blake, who lives and works in Manchester:

I would like to know what the council’s position on forced academisation is?  I would also like to know if there are plans by the council to make a similar resolution to other councils to oppose the forced academies agenda?  I would also like to know if you plan to follow your own "Local Government Association-Labour Group" advice to encourage schools like Parrs Wood High School not to rush to convert?

Councillor Sheila Newman, replied:

Thank you for your enquiry. The City Council is opposed to the forced academisation of successful schools, and believes that such schools should be able to determine their own future.  The Council has, in meetings with headteachers, made clear its concerns that successful schools do not feel the need to rush to convert to academy status, but recognises that there is a broad range of factors that schools need to consider, including the local and national context, when determining their plans for the future. The Council respects and supports those that choose to convert as part of or to develop strong local partnerships.  The Council values the role academies play, working alongside maintained schools in the single family of schools that serves the City, in developing strong local partnerships of schools.

We are considering a notice of motion on academisation for the July Council meeting.

Parrs Wood School has made it's own decision about becoming an Academy and the process was well underway before the White Paper came out.

22nd June 2016.


Councillor Kate Chappell, Executive Member for the Environment, was asked a question by Phil Jenkins:

Are there any plans to introduce traffic calming measures in Hulme? Specifically the roads such as Peregrine Street, Rook Street, Mytton Street, Boston Street etc. All are supposed to be 20 mph, but cars go much faster than this and often fail to stop at the cross road junctions. Yesterday afternoon a car crashed into a garden wall and demolished it after mounting the pavement and I am aware of 2 other crashes in the past 12 months. There are a lot of children in this area , and the roads and even the footpaths are not safe. Speed bumps or other measures need to be introduced to slow people down.

Councillor Kate Chappell replied:

Thank you for your question.

The Council takes all incidents of speeding vehicles very seriously and we continue to work closely with GMP to address any incidents that may create a risk to pedestrians and other road users. With this in mind, the Council are undertaking a programme of works to reduce the speed on side roads throughout the city, such as Peregrine St, Rook St, Mytton St, Boston St and Blanchard St from 30mph to 20mph. Although this programme of works is ongoing, I can confirm that the side roads in Hulme had their speed limit reduced to 20mph in July 2015.

When assessing if a location warrants any form of traffic calming features, we check the number of collisions that have previously occurred, that have resulted in a Personal

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