Manchester City Council

The Council & democracy Questions to The Executive

Questions to The Executive for 2014

Councillor Sheila Newman, Executive Member for Children’s Services,  was asked a question by Chris Smith who lives in Manchester:

On what grounds is it justifiable to neglect to consider financial impact on surrounding or adjacent residences when considering the approval of planning applications? i.e. if someone loses 10% of their property value as a result of construction, why is this not considered?

Councillor Sheila Newman replied:

A material planning consideration is one which is relevant to making the planning decision in question (e.g. whether to grant or refuse an application for planning permission). The weight attached to material considerations in reaching a decision is a matter of judgement for the decision maker; however, in doing so it is necessary to demonstrate all relevant matters have been considered.
The starting point for any consideration of a planning application includes national, strategic and local policy.  Case law is also relevant and other factors likely to cause harm, such as impact from noise, dust, traffic and so on.  
National guidance states that the scope of what can constitute a material consideration is very wide and so the courts often do not indicate what cannot be a material consideration. However, in general they have taken the view that planning is concerned with land use in the public interest, so that the protection of purely private interests such as the impact of a development on the value of a neighbouring property or loss of private rights to light could not be material considerations.

11 November 2014.


Councillor Bernard Priest, Deputy Leader was asked a question by Dominic Cork who lives and works in Manchester:

As there is no nationwide law preventing alcohol being consumed in public places, I would like to know if there are any bylaws within Manchester that restricts this. If so, could I be provided with a comprehensive breakdown of any areas that prohibit alcohol consumption in public places within Greater Manchester. Thank you

Councillor Bernard Priest replied:

Provisions contained in the Criminal Justice and Police Act 2001 and the Violent Crime Reduction Act 2006 enable local authorities to designate places where restrictions on public drinking apply, through introducing Designated Public Place Orders. The powers do not make it a criminal offence to consume alcohol within the designated area, rather the offence is committed if the individual refuses to comply with an officer’s request to refrain from drinking. These powers replaced drinking bye-laws.  

I am unable to provide any information relating to other local authorities, but the areas below are covered by a Designated Public Place Order in Manchester.  

Wythenshawe – certain public areas:  
Civic Centre – area bounded by Poundswick Lane / Rowlands Way / Simons Way
Peel Hall Road Shops – the area of Peel Hall Road along its length from its junction with Hopton Avenue to its junction with Bleak Hey Road, the service road at the rear of Nos. 33 to 53 Peel Hall Road and Longwood Road form its junction with Peel Hall Road to its junction with Garland Road.
Hall Lane – the area bounded by the railway line / Hall Lane / Haybarn Road and Sandacre Road
Gladeside Road – the area bounded by Gladeside Road / Nathane Road / Mottershead Road / Greenwood Road
Moorcroft Road – the area of Moorcroft Road from its junction with Garthorpe Road to its junction with Mossdale Road, Aldfield Road from its junction with Moorcroft Road to its junction with Ramsgill Road, Welbury Road from its junction with Moorcroft Road to its junction with Sedbury Close and Sledmoor Road from its junction with Moorcroft Road to its junction with Wythenshawe Road
Northenden – the area bounded by the M60 Motorway / Boat Lane / Church Road / Kenworthy Lane / M60 Motorway
Sale Circle – Sale Road along its length between its junction with Dane Avenue and Newhall Drive, and Carloon Road between its junction with Sale Road and Yarmouth Drive
Burnsall Walk – Portway along its length between its junction with Hindley Avenue and Plowden Road and along the length of Burnsall Walk and its Service Road.
Hollyhedge Road – the area bounded by Woodhouse Lane / Longhey Road / Brownley Road / Woodend Road / Walney Road 
Bowland Road – Bowland Road along its length from its junction with Bardon Road to its junction with Calcot Walk, Maltby Road to its junction with Ditton Walk and the service road for Nos 17 to 29. 

Openshaw      
Delamere Park

Oxford Road Corridor    
Area bounded by Upper Brook Street (from the Mancunian Way to Hathersage Road), Hathersage Road (from Upper Brook Street to Oxford Road), Oxford Road (from Hathersage Road to Moss Lane East) and including the whole of Whitworth Park and the whole of the Manchester University Campus and along the campus boundary from Denmark Road to the junction of Upper Lloyd Street North / Higher Cambridge Street (from Devas Street to the Mancunian Way) and the Mancunian Way (from Higher Cambridge Street to Upper Brook Street.  

Sport City Beswick     
The area bounded by Great Ancoats Street, Old Mill Street, Bradford Road, Hulme Hall Lane, Alan Turing Way, Gibbon Street, the service road forming part of the east boundary of Asda Walmart Eastlands, Ashton New Road, Clayton Lane, Parkhouse Street, Wood Street, Ashton Old Road, Alan Turing Way, Grey Mare Lane, Albert Street, Orme Street, Palmerston Street, Gurney Street, Every Street, Carruthers Street, Pollard Street, Great Ancoats Street.

Higher Blackley and Charlestown
Area bounded by the M60 Motorway, Greengate, Moston Lane, Charlestown Road, Belthorne Avenue, the track leading from Charlestown Road in a southerly direction and adjourning the boundary of North Manchester High School for Girls and then the track adjourning the east boundary of Boggart Hole Clough and leading in a northerly direction back to Charlestown Road, Rochdale Road, Middleton Old Road, The Brow, Old Market Street, Mill Brow, Blackley New Road, River Irk, Victoria Avenue, Middleton Road, the M60 Motorway

Harpurhey and Moston    
Area bounded by Collyhurst Street, Rochdale Road, Northern boundary of Manchester General Cemetery, Camel Road, Hendham Vale, River Irk, a line North north east to the track at its northern end being Bottomly Side, Slack Road, Andrew Road, Sidney Road, Old Road, a line East to Rochdale Road, Boggart Hole Brook, a line to the North of Moston Fields Primary School to Brookside Road, Inchfield Road, Horncastle Road, Rudston Avenue, a line South to Nunfield Close, Moston Lane, Nuthurst Road, railway track north to Hollinwood Avenue, Moston Lane East, the City boundary northeast Hollinwood Avenue, the City boundary South south east to Rochdale Canal, Parkfield Road North, the City boundary South to Moston Lane East, the City boundary West to Broadway, the City boundary South to South of Broadhurst Primary School and West along a line to St Mary’s Road, Railway track Southwest to Collyhurst Street. 

Whalley Range    
The area of Whalley Range

Newton Heath, Miles Platting, Ancoats, Collyhurst South and Clayton   
The whole of Newton Heath & Miles Platting and Ancoats & Clayton wards, (excluding existing areas within these boundaries which are already subject to a drinking restriction order 

Bradford     
Area bounded by Great Ancoats Street, Pin Mill Brow, Ashton Old Road, Rondin Road, Gorton Road, Manchester to Fairfield Railway Line Lane as far as Manshaw Road, Ashton Old Road then including all of Victor Mann Street and Gransmoore Avenue, Club Street, Toxteth Street, Burman Street, Peel Street, Fairfield Street, Edge Lane, Manchester Road, Ashton New Road, Clayton Lane, Parkhouse Street, Wood Street, Ashton Old Road, Alan Turing Way, Grey Mare Lane, Albert Street, Orme Street, Palmerstone Street, Gurney Street, Pollard Street, Great Ancoats Street 

Rusholme and Fallowfield    
Area bounded by 1) Moss Lane East, Wilmslow Road, Rusholme Place, Oxford Place, Anson Road, Dickenson Road, Wilmslow Road, Platt Lane, Heald Place and 2) Wilmslow Road from its junction with Platt Lane to its junction with Latchmere Road and 3) Wilbraham Road from its junction with Wellington Road to its junction with Wilmslow Road and 4) Moseley Road from its junction with Wilmslow Road to its junction with Ladybarn Lane.  

Gorton North and Gorton South   
The wards of Gorton North and Gorton South 

Ardwick      
The area bounded by Grosvenor Street; Downing Street; Ardwick Green North; Higher Union Street; Stockport Road; Lauderdale Crescent; Bryant Close; Kincardine Road. 

City Centre     
The area bounded by the River Irwell, Regent Road Dawson Street, Egerton Street, Mancunian Way, Fairfield Street, Pin Mill Brow, Great Ancoats Street, New Cross, Swan Street, Miller Street, Cheetham Hill Road and Trinity Way.  

Hulme      
Princess Road at the junction with the Mancunian Way; south to the junction of Moss Lane East; east along Moss Lane East to the junction of Whitworth Park and north along the western edge of Whitworth Park; west along Denmark Road to the junction with Cecil Street; along Cecil Street to Divas Street to Lloyd Street North; along Higher Cambridge Street to the junction with the Mancunian Way; west along the Mancunian Way to include the whole of the roundabout at the junction of the Mancunian Way, Medlock Street and Princess Road AND Chorlton Road at the junction of the Mancunian Way; south along Chorlton Road to the junction of Stretford Road; east along Stretford Road to the junction with Princess Road; north along Princess Road to the junction with the Mancunian Way; west along the Mancunian Way to the junction with Chorlton Road. 

Withington      
Wilmslow Road at the junction with Sherwood Street, south to Egerton Road, along Egerton Road to Derby Road, along Derby Road to Wilmslow Road, south along Wilmslow Road to Heaton Road, along Heaton Road to Parsonage Road, west along Parsonage Road to the junction with Wilmslow Road, south along Wilmslow Road to Marriott Street, along Marriott Street, across Palatine Road and along Candleforth Road to Bridgelea Road, north along Bridgelea Road to Burton Road, west into Burton Road to Old Moat Lane to Copson Street, east along Mauldeth Road West to Wellington Road, north along Wellington Road to Sherwood Street, and along Sherwood Street to the junction with Wilmslow Road

21 October 2014.


Councillor Bernard Priest, Deputy Leader was asked a question by Carrie Bradbury who lives in Manchester:

Who would I get in touch with to ask about trees hanging over a walk way.

Councillor Bernard Priest replied:

We do welcome people reporting problems and this can be done by reporting online via the Council’s website.

http://www.manchester.gov.uk/

21 October 2014.


Councillor Sheila Newman, Executive Member for Children's Services was asked a question by Michelle Martin who lives in Salford:

I am currently trying to get my child a nursery place outside of Manchester, I am getting nowhere on the school admissions website. I have also been on the phone and been on hold now for at least twenty minutes three times and got nowhere. I need to know where and how I can apply for a school place as Salford city council who I spoke to said I need to apply through you, even though my address is Salford but pay Manchester council tax.


Councillor Sheila Newman replied:

Thank you for your enquiry. I am sorry that you have had difficulty in contacting the school admissions service,  the contact centre are doing everything possible to try and reduce call waiting times however, it is an extremely busy time of year. Nursery applications are not dealt with by the Admissions Service in Manchester the schools process these direct, we only process applications for children starting reception through to year 11. Salford school admissions do however process admissions to their nurseries and should be contacted direct. They do have an online application that can be accessed by the following link: http://www.salford.gov.uk/preschool.htm

Depending on your child's date of birth, if it is between 1/9/10 - 31/8/11 you will also need to apply for a reception place by 15 January 2015 to be allocated a place for September 2015 entry. As you are a Manchester resident this is done on the Manchester application form regardless of where the schools you wish to apply for are located, this can be found at the following link: http://www.manchester.gov.uk/admissions

I hope this information has answered your question, should you have any further questions please contact the school admissions service on 0161 245 7166 or email school.admissions@manchester.gov.uk

17 October 2014.


Councillor Jeff Smith, Executive Member for Housing & Regeneration was asked a question by Mrs D Nevin who lives in Manchester:

I live close to Shenton's Farm on Newall Road , Newall Green and heard with horror that the farm house has been destroyed by fire. I would like to know why the council have allowed a listed building to degenerate into a ruin. It has been empty and unused for many years and just allowed to rot. Why was a responsible tenant not found to take care of the house before it fell into ruin. This just another historic building in Wythenshawe which the council has allowed to decay. I suppose now the land surrounding the old farm house will be used for new housing or expanding the industrial estate. I have lived in Wythenshawe for most of my life and find the destruction of old houses and buildings in the area unforgiveable. I do not think this would be allowed to happen in the City Centre. What explanation do you have for this situation? I look forward to your reply.

Councillor Jeff Smith replied:

Thank you for your question.

Newall Green Farm is a grade II listed heritage asset. Manchester City Council sold the farm in 2006 by way of a 200 year lease.  The intention of the sale was to facilitate development that would complement the farm and ensure its long term future.  Initial plans for redevelopment encountered planning problems and following the economic downturn in 2008, development was increasingly difficult to progress.

Manchester City Council have recently been working very closely with the current owners to bring forward development.  The proposals which now have full planning permission include the repair and conversion of the main farmhouse, along with the conversion of the adjacent barns into supported residential accommodation, and final details of the proposals were being put together to make a start on site later this year.

In the meantime, the perimeter had been protected with security fencing and the site monitored by security. In addition various weatherproofing works to the roof and the boarded and blocking of windows had been undertaken to attempt to preserve the asset and prevent further damage.

Discussions are taking place with the owners to assess the impact of the fire on these proposals and establish how much damage has been caused and how much of the building can be saved.

The Council will continue to work with the owners to preserve as much as possible of this important listed building and bring forward a sustainable new use that will secure its future.

15 July 2014.

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Councillor Nigel Murphy, Executive Member for Housing & Regeneration was asked a question by Andrew Wigley who lives in Manchester:

How have the ex council tenants of Hulme lost there preserved right to buy because of the city challenge regeneration? We were moved as our flats were to be knocked down into Guinness Trust flats, then re transferred to one of the other 12 Hulme housing associations but under this system we have no rights left! Were we lied to after being told were would have the preserved right to buy?

Councillor Nigel Murphy replied:

The Preserved Right to Buy is guaranteed to Council tenants when the home they live in is transferred to a Housing Association. The Council did not transfer ownership of the Council -owned homes as part of the Hulme regeneration project, it demolished them. Tenants living in Hulme at the time were offered the following options: 

  • to be rehoused in a Manchester City Council home elsewhere in Manchester 
  • to be rehoused in an existing Housing Association home in Manchester 
  • to move temporarily and then return to Hulme in a new Housing Association home.
  • to find their own solution.

Only the first option would enable a tenant to retain their right to buy entitlement.  The second two options give tenants a 'Right to Acquire' under Housing Association rules.  Where tenants have moved to Housing Association properties and they are interested in acquiring their home, they should contact their landlord for details and entitlement.

28 May 2014.


Councillor Kate Chappell, Executive Member for the Environment was asked a question by Rianna Riaz who lives and works in Manchester:

Has any Executive Member been consulted in regards to the Planning Application made by Moss Care to build social housing on derelict land on Beresford Street (Moss Side) and if so, has planning approval been granted and why?

Councillor Kate Chappell replied:

No members were specifically consulted on the planning application.  Having regard to the scale and nature of the proposal and the matters for consideration, the decision was taken to determine the application by the Head of Planning under the scheme of delegation.

28 May 2014.


Councillor Jeff Smith, Executive Member for Finance & Human Resources was asked a question by Peter Batson who lives in Manchester:

How many jobs have been transferred from the public to the private sector as a result of privatisation or outsourcing by Manchester City Council since May 2010.

Councillor Jeff Smith replied:

Thank you for your question. I can confirm that from the period beginning May 2010 only one job has moved from Manchester City Council to the private sector. This was as a result of the contracting out of our Occupational Health Service in March 2012. In terms of overall TUPE transfers there has been 569 staff transferred to other public service such as Housing Associations, Schools and Health Services or Council owned Companies such as One Education.  

16 May 2014.


Councillor Sue Murphy, Deputy Leader, was asked a question by Nigel O'Connell who lives and works in Manchester:

Can you please confirm that in light of the recent Angora fur scandal that the Lord Mayors ceremonial robe does not contain real fur, many thanks.

Councillor Sue Murphy replied:

Thank you for your question.

I can confirm that the Lord Mayor's ceremonial robe does not contain real fur.

22 January 2014.


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