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Manchester proposes changes to hot food takeaway planning rules

Changes are being proposed to Manchester’s planning policy on applications to open new hot food takeaways, in a bid to improve centres and promote healthier lifestyles across the city.

The changes, which will go before the Neighbourhood and Environment Scrutiny Committee on Tuesday 28 February and the Executive Committee on 8 March 2017, are being proposed to tackle concerns about the negative effects of fast food on children's health and on the impact of takeaways within district centres, especially in areas where there are high numbers or concentrations. 

If adopted, the new policy would seek to control the opening times of new takeaways in the vicinity of schools and manage the overall number of takeaways in the city.

By restricting opening hours of new takeaways within a presumed 400 metre ‘buffer around primary or secondary schools, the aim of the policy is to promote healthier choices during children’s meal times. 

The new policy would also see a range of potential impacts on residents considered before permission was granted for a new takeaway outlet, to ensure that district centre shop usage is balanced, with a range of different shops open throughout the day. 

These would include:

The number of hot food takeaways already open in the vicinity
Potential for increased noise, traffic, or anti-social behaviour in the local area
Existence of measures to ensure that waste and customer litter is appropriately managed

Councillor Rosa Battle, Manchester City Council executive member for the environment, said: “While hot food takeaways are a well-known and popular part of the city’s economy, these proposed changes in planning policy will provide us with another way to try to tackle the problem of obesity among children, while helping to ensure that our district centres remain vibrant, diverse places for people to live, work and socialise.”

ENDS